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Consultant Needed for EU Project Evaluation

Folkekirkens Nødhjælp

Virksom - a-kasse og faglig organisation for selvstændige


Funded by the European Union

Call for expression of interest to undertake consultancy assignments for DCA and partner implemented project, funded by the European Union titled: “The Future is Equal – Empowerment of women in Upper Nile State
1.0 Background and Introduction
1.1 Introduction of the Organisation
DanChurchAid (DCA) is a decentralised Danish NGO, which primarily works with both local and international NGO partners, and it is a strong member of international networks/alliances including churches. DCA’s headquarter is in Copenhagen and has offices in 16 countries worldwide but supports projects/programmes in at least 25 countries. It seeks to assist the most marginalised populations through its four thematic programme types in South Sudan, namely, Active Citizenship, Right to Food, Humanitarian Response and Humanitarian Mine Action (HMA). Advocacy, right based approach (RBA), Nexus and Gender are its added value strategies in all interventions to address DCA global goals of Save Lives, Build Resilience and Fight Extreme inequality.
DCA works with local communities and is increasingly involved in building the capacity of partners, communities, and local government institutions as well as its own staff. DCA’s South Sudan regional office is based in Juba and implements programmed through its partners in Jonglei, Upper Nile, Eastern Equatorial, Unity and Central Equatorial states.
1.2 Background for Consultancy
This term of reference for the consultancy outlines the terms of engagement for an independent consultant/firm to develop and carry out a project baseline and end line survey, conduct the data analysis, and reporting for the two surveys. The TOR is broken down into 2 annexes for the different assignment to be carried out by the consultant namely, baseline and end of project evaluation.
1.3 Introduction of the Project
The Future is Equal – Empowerment of women in Upper Nile State is funded by the European Union, and throughout this project DCA and its local partner AADO will implement an integrated approach to promote women’s economic, political, and social empowerment at the local level in Ulang and Longechuk counties in Upper Nile State in the Northeast of South Sudan. The selected locations are among the most volatile areas of South Sudan, with specific challenges related to high rates of human rights violations and gender-based violence (GBV), including rape. Women and girls are the primary stakeholders of the action and will take on a leading role in the implementation and design of the action, taking charge of their lives and claiming equal rights, with continuous support through the proposed action. Men and boys will be engaged significantly, especially through the Engaging Men in Accountable Practices (EMAP) approach to facilitate attitude change towards women and girls. The engagement of influential stakeholders will further increase ownership of the change in attitudes and result in a significant reduction of use of harmful traditional practices. In addition, the action will aim to provide support to GBV service providers, including psychosocial support (PSS) providers, legal and paralegal service providers as well as medical facilities and actors providing clinical management of rape (CMR). Coupled with this are strengthened social support structures within the already existing social spaces in Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs), producer groups and GBV committees, which will reduce the culture of silence around gender injustice and provide support for those affected. The action envisages the final beneficiaries and engaged stakeholders of the action as future shapers of attitudes, practices and behaviours of people, advancing gender equality using the structures established through this action. By continuing to address expressions of toxic masculinity like GBV and violence against women and girls (VAW/G) within the targeted communities and beyond and offering response services within the referral pathway, final beneficiaries will contribute to nurturing a culture of intolerance to gender inequality.

1.3.1 Project Goal:
The overall objectiveof the action focuses on empowering women and girls in South Sudan, specifically in Ulang and Longechuk Counties of Upper Nile State, who have been facing marginalisation and limitation as a result of a highly patriarchal and traditional society. This action will serve as a contribution to the promotion of women’s economic, political and social empowerment at the local level, with specific attention to those in the most vulnerable situations.
Overall objective indicators

  • % of women with increased economic independency, control over household assets, decision-making power at household level and time savings
  • % of women and older adolescent girls who are enjoying equal decision-making power in political and civic structures at the local level
  • % of women, girls, men and boys with improved attitudes toward women’s and girls’ empowerment

1.3.2. Project expected outcomes and outputs:
Outcome 1: Targeted communities demonstrate increased gender equality and awareness of harmful behaviour and social norms

  • Output 1.1: Men and boys trained on Engaging Men in Accountable Practice (EMAP) approaches and especially with focus on change of attitude and behaviour towards women and girls
  • Output 1.2: Community members made aware on general concept of GBV including women and girls’ rights within the community through awareness raising sessions

Outcome 2: Economic capacity of targeted women and girls through entrepreneurship skills and vocational training is enhanced

  • Output 2.1. Women and older adolescent girls trained on entrepreneurship skills/ economic empowerment
  • Output 2.2. Women and older adolescent girls trained on practical vocational skills

Outcome 3: Trained women and older girls’ take on leadership roles and actively participate in community decision-making processes

  • Output 3.1. Women and older girls trained on leadership skills and decision-making roles within the community

Outcome 4: Access to quality and timely services for GBV survivors within the targeted communities is improved

  • Output 4.1. Case workers from the partners’ implementing response services trained on psychosocial support, case management and data protection to handle GBV survivors
  • Output 4.2. Community members (Chiefs, women’s leaders, police, paralegals) trained on national legal framework on GBV legal process and access to justice for GBV survivors
  • Output 4.3. Medical practitioners trained on Clinical Management of Rape (CMR)
  • Output 4.4. Community leaders (religious, traditional, youth and women leaders, Boma chiefs, Payam Administrators and NGO partners) trained on GBV Basic concepts for good coordination, referral pathways and networking

2.0. Purpose of the Consultancy
DCA would like to contract one independent consultant/firm to undertake the two listed assignments exclusively. These external processes will consist of qualitative and quantitative data collection, contextualised by inclusion of consultations, KIIs and FGDs with stakeholders, beneficiaries and community members. Triangulation through secondary sources will further add to the complete picture to put findings and recommendations into context. DCA and partner will support in logistical support during the assignment. The consultant undertakes the technical assignments as stipulated in the two separate TORs for the baseline and endline described below:
2.1. Baseline Survey
The baseline survey’s overall purpose is to establish the pre-project conditions in the targeted intervention areas from which a comparison can be made for the purpose of monitoring and evaluating the intended goal and outcomes of the action. The baseline is also intended to collect data to be used to benchmark performance of the project in line with its objectives. For the baseline, the consultant will development the tools for baseline data collection, lead the data collection process and conduct analysis and reporting, guided by the project logical framework to track project indicators and targets to establish baseline values. Prior to the baseline, the results should be assessed from an evaluation perspective. If need be, the baseline results will be used to inform revision of the project indicators. It will also establish and validate the evaluation approach with a robust and detailed methodology that will form the foundation for the final evaluation. In addition, the baseline will enable DCA, its partners and its donors to capture any unforeseen issues that will be vital to enable the smooth implementation of the project.
The survey methodology will clearly outline a sample design and sample size calculation that incorporate considerations of age, gender, diversity, and methods of analysis.
2.1.1. Deliverables

  • Inception report
  • Presentation of first draft
  • Baseline report

See Annex 1 for details on specific outputs for the baseline.

2.2 End of Project Evaluation
The purpose of the evaluation is to demonstrate how the project achieved its intended objectives and determine what changes it brought to the target communities. The evaluation will be conducted at the end of the project in 2023.
2.1.1. Deliverables

  • Inception report
  • Presentation of first draft
  • Evaluation report

See Annex 2 for details on specific outputs for the evaluation.

DCA will share the detailed Logical Framework with the successful consultant for full consolidation with the objectives of the baseline and end of project evaluation.

3.0 Scope of Consultancy
The project runs for two years from 1st February 2021 till 31st January 2023. This consultancy comprises of number of two assignments to be undertaken at two different time points. The baseline survey is to be conducted in March/April 2021, and the end of project evaluation in January/February 2023.
4.0 Evaluation Management and Values
4.1 Management

  • The entire exercise is structured to adopt joint planning sessions with project staff, programme briefings by management staff in line with the logframe, project documents, and the country strategy. Others include focus group discussions, key informant interviews with stakeholders, protection cluster representatives, implementing partner staff and government representatives in each targeted county.
  • DCA’s Programme Officer (M&E) will be the focal point for the consultancy.
  • Using different methods, the surveys are expected to collect relevant data and to triangulate it throughout from different sources and methodologies, thus ensuring greater validity of information. Groups that will provide the required data include NNGOs, INGOs, DCA and partner programme staff, community groups, government representatives and special interest groups within the community (such as protection committees, medical staff and community leaders). Secondary data from previous reviews, progress reports, proposals, and other related documents will be considered.
  • The consultant shall use the electronic data collection platform KoBoToolbox and KoBoCollect throughout the data collection.
  • A debriefing session will be held with the programme staff at the end of field visits. The debriefing sessions will provide a summary of the outcome of the surveys.
  • A team comprising of DCA’s Head of Programme, Programme Coordinator and Programme Officers, as well as relevant AADO staffs will support the consultant on matters particularly related to the baseline.
  • DCA will provide overall operational/logistical coordination for the baseline study.
  • Accommodation and transport for the consultant during field work will be catered for by DCA.
  • Survey logistics such as translators, car/boat hire, facilitators, office space or training venues, internet will be provided by DCA or its partners.
  • DCA will process security clearances for consultants with the respective authorities.
  • Domestic travel will be arranged through DCA. However, the consultant is responsible for planning their international flights/visa, if coming from outside of South Sudan.
  • DCA will reimburse or meet costs associated with vias and registration.

4.2 Ethical Considerations
Consultant should ensure appropriate, safe, and non-discriminatory participation of all respondents in the survey. This includes obtaining free and informed consent and voluntary participation and ensuring that data is kept in a secure and confidential manner and the anonymity of respondents is protected in the presentation of findings.

  • South Sudan is a fragile state with UN security rating of ‘grey’.
  • Arabic is widely spoken in South Sudan.
  • DCA and partners comply with the Core Humanitarian Standards (CHS).
  • DCA adheres to Prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse (PSEA) and child protection policies.

Therefore, the consultant must not compromise the values of DCA and will sign the DCA Code of conduct before commencing with any assignment.4.3 Consultancy Experience:
Below follows a brief explanation of the consultant(s) with emphasis on previous experience in similar work; profile of the consultant(s) to be involved in undertaking the consultancy; proposal for undertaking this assignment as detailed in the ToR is required. A financial proposal including cost estimates for services rendered and daily consultancy fees.
The consultancy must offer expertise with the below essential and desirable profiles and qualifications. A gender balance could enable complete coverage of the different aspects of the consultancy as set out in these terms of reference, including cross-cutting issues.

4.4 Essential:

  • Holding a higher university degree in gender studies, statistics, monitoring and evaluation, project planning and management, social sciences, or any other relevant field with over 12 years of experience in gender and protection programming in fragile countries.
  • Knowledge on gender and protection programming, community vulnerability, NEXUS, rights-based and participatory approaches.
  • Strong understanding of the South Sudan context (specifically the context in Upper Nile State), policies and advocacy work.
  • Broad knowledge of humanitarian and development issues, specifically in gender, protection and livelihoods approaches.
  • Sound understanding of SPHERE standards, Core Humanitarian Standards and MEAL best practices and approaches.
  • Fully conversant with the principles and working methods of project cycle management, humanitarian evaluation methods and techniques, including a thorough understanding of data collection, evaluation methodologies and design, participatory approaches, and strong qualitative and quantitative research skills.
  • Experience with evaluations in conflict-affected contexts
  • Experience of integrating gender dynamics within participatory data collection.
  • Fluency in English, strong analysis, report writing and communication skills.
  • Strong analytical skills, ability to clearly present findings, draw conclusions and make recommendations.
  • Good interpersonal skills and understanding cultural sensitivities.
  • Ability to work under pressure and to meet deadlines.
  • Ability to deal with hardship and remote area field work.

4.5 Desirable:

  • Experience working in South Sudan or East Africa
  • Experience working for the European Union or experience of evaluating projects funded by the European Union.
  • Active member of gender and or protection network.
  • Knowledge of local languages is seen as an asset.
  • Knowledge of South Sudan’s COVID-19 situation and measures.

NB: Consultants and Service providers to DCA are subjected to comply with the organisation’s Code of Conduct, Child Protection and PSEA policy.

5.0 How to apply.
This is a two-stage process, interested consultants and or firms should submit expression of interest, CVs and cover letter briefly describing how they intend to carry out the work within the COVID-19 context. Only shortlisted consultants/firms will be requested to submit detailed proposals, budgets CVs and past experience of similar work.

Please consult Annex 1 and 2 for Detailed Terms of Reference for each assignment:

    • TOR for Baseline Survey
    • TOR for End of Project Evaluation

    A detailed Project Intervention Logic will be shared with the successful consultant.Annex 1
    Terms of Reference for Baseline Survey for DCA and partner implemented project, funded by the European Union titled: “The Future is Equal – Empowerment of women in Upper Nile State
    1.0 Background and Introduction
    1.1 Introduction of the Organisation
    DanChurchAid (DCA) is a decentralised Danish NGO, which primarily works with both local and international NGO partners, and it is a strong member of international networks/alliances including churches. DCA’s headquarter is in Copenhagen and has offices in 16 countries worldwide but supports projects/programmes in at least 25 countries. It seeks to assist the most marginalised populations through its four thematic programme types in South Sudan, namely, Active Citizenship, Right to Food, Humanitarian Response and Humanitarian Mine Action (HMA). Advocacy, right based approach (RBA), Nexus and Gender are its added value strategies in all interventions to address DCA global goals of Save Lives, Build Resilience and Fight Extreme inequality.
    DCA works with local communities and is increasingly involved in building the capacity of partners, communities, and local government institutions as well as its own staff. DCA’s South Sudan regional office is based in Juba and implements programmed through its partners in Jonglei, Upper Nile, Eastern Equatorial, Unity and Central Equatorial states.
    1.2 Background for Consultancy
    This term of reference describes DCA’s South Sudan objectives to undertake a Baseline survey for its project titled “The Future is Equal – Empowerment of women in Upper Nile State” funded by the European Union, and implemented through DCA’s local partner Across Africa Development Organisation (AADO). The ToR briefly describes the purposes of the baseline, proposed scope of work, methodologies, and deliverables from the survey team. Below are the details of the project Baseline considerations.

    1.3 Introduction of the Project
    The Future is Equal – Empowerment of women in Upper Nile State is funded by the European Union, and throughout this project DCA and its local partner AADO will implement an integrated approach to promote women’s economic, political and social empowerment at the local level in Ulang and Longechuk counties in Upper Nile State in the Northeast of South Sudan. The selected locations are among the most volatile areas of South Sudan, with specific challenges related to high rates of human rights violations and gender-based violence (GBV), including rape. Women and girls are the primary stakeholders of the action and will take on a leading role in the implementation and design of the action, taking charge of their lives and claiming equal rights, with continuous support through the proposed action. Men and boys will be engaged significantly, especially through the Engaging Men in Accountable Practices (EMAP) approach to facilitate attitude change towards women and girls. The engagement of influential stakeholders will further increase ownership of the change in attitudes and result in a significant reduction of use of harmful traditional practices. In addition, the action will aim to provide support to GBV service providers, including psychosocial support (PSS) providers, legal and paralegal service providers as well as medical facilities and actors providing clinical management of rape (CMR). Coupled with this are strengthened social support structures within the already existing social spaces in Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs), producer groups and GBV committees, which will reduce the culture of silence around gender injustice and provide support for those affected. The action envisages the final beneficiaries and engaged stakeholders of the action as future shapers of attitudes, practices and behaviours of people, advancing gender equality using the structures established through this action. By continuing to address expressions of toxic masculinity like GBV and violence against women and girls (VAW/G) within the targeted communities and beyond and offering response services within the referral pathway, final beneficiaries will contribute to nurturing a culture of intolerance to gender inequality.
    1.3.1. Project Goal
    The overall objectiveof the action focuses on empowering women and girls in South Sudan, specifically in Ulang and Longechuk Counties of Upper Nile State, who have been facing marginalisation and limitation as a result of a highly patriarchal and traditional society. This action will serve as a contribution to the promotion of women’s economic, political and social empowerment at the local level, with specific attention to those in the most vulnerable situations.
    1.3.2. Overall objective indicators

    • % of women with increased economic independency, control over household assets, decision-making power at household level and time savings
    • % of women and older adolescent girls who are enjoying equal decision-making power in political and civic structures at the local level
    • % of women, girls, men and boys with improved attitudes toward women’s and girls’ empowerment

    1.3.3. Project expected outcomes and outputs
    Outcome 1: Targeted communities demonstrate increased gender equality and awareness of harmful behaviour and social norms

    • Output 1.1: Men and boys trained on Engaging Men in Accountable Practice (EMAP) approaches and especially with focus on change of attitude and behaviour towards women and girls
    • Output 1.2: Community members made aware on general concept of GBV including women and girls’ rights within the community through awareness raising sessions

    Outcome 2: Economic capacity of targeted women and girls through entrepreneurship skills and vocational training is enhanced

    • Output 2.1. Women and older adolescent girls trained on entrepreneurship skills/ economic empowerment
    • Output 2.2. Women and older adolescent girls trained on practical vocational skills

    Outcome 3: Trained women and older girls’ take on leadership roles and actively participate in community decision-making processes

    • Output 3.1. Women and older girls trained on leadership skills and decision-making roles within the community

    Outcome 4: Access to quality and timely services for GBV survivors within the targeted communities is improved

    • Output 4.1. Case workers from the partners’ implementing response services trained on psychosocial support, case management and data protection to handle GBV survivors
    • Output 4.2. Community members (Chiefs, women’s leaders, police, paralegals) trained on national legal framework on GBV legal process and access to justice for GBV survivors.
    • Output 4.3. Medical practitioners trained on Clinical Management of Rape (CMR)
    • Output 4.4. Community leaders (religious, traditional, youth and women leaders, Boma chiefs, Payam Administrators and NGO partners) trained on GBV Basic concepts for good coordination, referral pathways and networking.

    2.0. Purpose of the baseline
    The baseline survey’s overall purpose is to establish the pre-project conditions in key intervention areas from which a comparison can be made for the purpose of monitoring and evaluating the intended goal and outcomes of projects. The baseline is also intended to collect data to be used to benchmark performance of the project in line with its objectives. In addition, the baseline will enable DCA, its partners and its donors to capture any unforeseen issues that will be vital to enable the smooth implementation of the project. 2.1. Specific objectives of the baseline

    • To establish the status of project indicators with regard to gender equality and women’s empowerment. This will serve as a basis for measuring milestones on outcomes.
    • To assess effectiveness and organizational efficiency in progressing towards the achievement of gender equality and women’s empowerment results as defined in the intervention.
    • Assess prevailing social and economic contexts in the project area that implementation will need to consider;
    • Establish livelihood activities mostly practiced by the communities through a gender lens;
    • To provide an in-depth indicative information on the status of community safety and security of vulnerable populations in the project intervention areas;
    • Access the appropriateness of the proposed action for all individuals and groups (women, men, youth);
    • To identify the existing protection and violence prevention issues and activities in the project intervention areas;
    • Determine main needs of the beneficiaries within the proposed project description that the programming should address;
    • Access appropriateness of indicators;
    • To provide benchmark information for measuring project achievements and outcomes based on the project log frame;
    • Determine the synergies of this project with other Partners implemented projects in the same geographic area and coordination with other actors and make recommendation aimed at achieving greater impact;
    • Asses how to minimise the unintended negative effects which can increase people's vulnerability to both physical and psychosocial risks;
    • To identify major external factors that may influence or impact the implementation of the project;
    • Assess any potential risks to the project and how cross-cutting themes will be integrated into the project.

    DCA will share the detailed Logical Framework with the successful consultant for full consolidation with the objectives of the baseline.
    3.0. Baseline Scope and Methodology
    3.1 Baseline Scope

    • Geographical Scope: The action is estimated to benefit 11.588 women and 7.268 older adolescent girls who are either survivors or at high risk of violence in Ulang and Longechuk counties, Upper Nile State, South Sudan.
    • Baseline Timing: The project runs for two years from 1st. of February 2021 to 31. January 2023. The baseline assignment will be expected to be carried out in the month of March/April 2021.
    • Baseline Report: The baseline will measure and benchmark the current situation and coverage of the selected project goal, outcomes, and indicators across the implementation areas. Henceforth, the consultant will be required to undertake the baseline using the most appropriate and representative quantitative and qualitative survey techniques to produce a quality baseline report.

    3.2 Baseline Methodology
    A combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches will be used. Proposed approaches will include cross-sectional household surveys, key informant interviews, focus group discussions, secondary documents review and analysis, as well as case studies, observations, or any other appropriate techniques and mix of techniques which best collects data from direct and indirect project beneficiaries. Where applicable, the consultant will adopt a participatory approach to respondents and project stakeholders, who may include representatives from national, state, or local government, partners and communities. In addition, the methodology should spell out how stakeholders will participate at each level during the baseline. The clusters are part of the stakeholders; hence the consultant should plan to meet the FSL Protection Health Clusters and other relevant stakeholders for relevant information/data sharing.

    • Techniques: Consultant should use a combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques to undertake this baseline. Survey techniques could combine or run as separate parallel surveys. Creativity in use of techniques is at discretion of the consultant. However, all techniques must be globally acceptable randomised techniques.
    • Data Quality: The design techniques of data collection should ensure and enforce data quality with quick steps back to revalidate data collected. All data shall meet standards such as accuracy, reliability, and validity of data. As part of data collection preparation, the consultant shall conduct thorough training of enumerators including pre-testing. The consultant will be expected to design tools and collect data using the electronic data collection tool KoBoToolbox and KoBoCollect for the survey.
    • Data Interpretation and Presentation: The consultant shall present data disaggregated by status, geographical levels, partners and gender, conducted with statically software for analysis and graphical presentations of project key indicators to establish trends over time to provide a comparative analysis with subsequent project monitoring during implementation and end of project evaluation.

    3.2.1 Specific Baseline Questions
    The report is expected to provide answers to the following, not exhaustive list of questions:
    Relevance & Quality of Design:

    • Does the project proposal conform to the goals of DCA’s country strategy?
    • Is the project design appropriate for the geographic area?
    • Is the intervention logic coherent and accurate?
    • Have recommendations from previous surveys/assessments been incorporated in the design?
    • Were any lessons learned from previous projects in the area applied?
    • Are the indicators of progress and impact in the design of good quality?

    Inclusion of the cross-cutting issues: (i.e. gender, age, diversity, protection, HIV, COVID-19, social inclusion and accountability to beneficiaries)

    • Will the project address the different needs of the beneficiaries in a consistent manner considering the different needs of women, men, girls and boys, different social and ethnic groups as well as disability issues and protection?
    • Do the measures the project is taking to contribute towards reduction of inequalities make sense? Are there ways to improve the reduction of inequality and gender mainstreaming across the project cycle?
    • What measures are in place to address the challenges associated with COVID-19 to protect communities during project implementation through measures that can minimise or prevent the spread of the virus while delivering project service and community acceptance?
    • Measure the adequacy of the interventions through set-up of appropriate accountability mechanisms to address concerns and complaints about the quality of services delivery.
    • Participation in decision making and empowerment opportunities to support development of self-protection, capacities and assist people to claim their rights to i.e. food, shelter, health, protection and education services.

    3.3 Expected outputs

    • Assessment of the current situation needs and priorities that will inform the project implementation and course of action.
    • Determine whether the proposed interventions are relevant in relation to the needs and priorities of the intended rights-holders;
    • Mapping of potential risks and community tensions as result of the assistance to targeted and untargeted populations;
    • Assessment of household control, decision-making power, participation and targeting risks for female in the project;
    • Confirmation of performance indicators and targets and established baseline values and information for regularly monitoring;
    • Form foundation for the planned final evaluation;
    • Situational analysis based on the quantitative and qualitative data collected, to assess the conditions for implementation, with the review including, but not limited to, policies, regulatory framework and the institutional set-up;
    • Assessment or identification of any key shortcomings, challenges and likelihoods of these to affect the project suitability;
    • Design methodology ensuring the data requirements for the final evaluation are covered by reviewing the indicators to ensure they remain relevant to the project.

    DCA will share the detailed Logical Framework with the successful consultant for further question development where needed for alignment.

    4.0. Deliverables and Schedule
    4.1 Inception Report
    An inception report is to be prepared and submitted by the consultant after an initial desk review of relevant documents. The report is to include:

    • Stakeholder mapping indicating various stakeholders to be interviewed and on what aspects.
    • Detailed evaluation design, methodology, and sample size criteria and calculations.
    • Detailed work plan including timelines, activities, and risks and mitigation measures.
    • Bibliography of documents/secondary data sources utilised.
    • Final data collection tools, such as a household survey, key informant interview guides, focus group discussion guides, and analysis plan.
    • Indicate who, if consultancy team, will undertake specific exercises and their roles, including their experiences and core competency/expertise.

    4.1.1 Presentation of first draft:
    The consultant will be required to organise a one-day presentation of the first draft baseline report, hold a debriefing meeting with DCA and partners to discuss the draft baseline report. The draft report must include:

    • Sampling Framework and tools
    • Raw data collected
    • Report stating methodologies, survey documents, findings, recommendations, and necessary support

    The debriefing meeting with DCA and partner is meant for discussion and feedback on the baseline report, and the final baseline report shall comply with the format and provide answers to the baseline questions.

    4.2. Baseline Report
    The final report shall include baselines on all relevant indicators based on the collected and analysed qualitative and quantitative data. The report will comply with the format and answering the baseline questions in a 1-3-25 format making use of the suggested report structure.

    4.3. Proposed Activities Scheduling
    Below is the proposed itinerary during the baseline. The baseline is expected to commence in March/April 2021:

    Activity/ Milestone
    Duration
    Consultant preparation
    3 days

    Meetings with project team in Juba, presentation of inception report
    2 days

    Field work in Ulang and Longechuck Counties
    6 days

    Debriefing
    3 day

    Data cleaning and analysis
    4 days

    Preparation of draft report for dissemination to DCA and partner
    3 days

    Total days
    21 days
    5.0. Baseline Management
    The consultant will develop the baseline methodology. Thereafter, a participatory review approach will be adopted to ensure key partner project staffs have a chance to meaningfully participate in refining the methodology and tools considering the foregoing:

    • The entire exercise is structured to adopt joint planning sessions with project staff, programme briefings by management staff in line with the logframe, project documents, and the country strategy. Others include focus group discussions, key informant interviews with stakeholders, protection cluster representatives, implementing partner staff and government representatives in each targeted county.
    • DCA’s Programme Officer (M&E) will be the focal point for the consultancy.
    • Using different methods, the baseline is expected to collect relevant data and to triangulate it throughout from different sources and methodologies, thus ensuring greater validity of information. Groups that will provide the required data include NNGOs, INGOs, DCA and partner programme staff, community groups, government representatives and special interest groups within the community (such as protection committees, medical staff and community leaders). Secondary data from previous reviews, progress reports, proposals, and other related documents will be considered.
    • The consultant shall use the electronic data collection platform KoBoToolbox and KoBoCollect throughout the data collection.
    • A debriefing session will be held with the programme staff at the end of the field visit. The debriefing sessions will provide a summary of the outcome of the baseline.
    • A team comprising of DCA’s Head of Programme, Programme Coordinator and Programme Officers, as well as relevant AADO staffs will support the consultant on matters particularly related to the baseline.
    • DCA will provide overall operational/logistical coordination for the baseline study.
    • Accommodation and transport for the consultant during the field work will be catered for by DCA.
    • Survey logistics such as translators, car/boat hire, facilitators, office space or training venues, internet will be provided by DCA or its partners.
    • DCA will process security clearances for consultants with the respective authorities.
    • Domestic travel will be arranged through DCA. However, the consultant is responsible for planning their international flights/visa, if coming from outside of South Sudan.
    • DCA will reimburse or meet costs associated with visa and registration.
    • The consultant shall elaborate on how to take the COVID-19 situation into account while conducting the baseline, given that virtual meetings may not be applicable in the context of rural South Sudan, therefore the consultant must come up with approaches to conduct the baseline survey in the expression of interest in this TOR.

    6.0. Terms and Conditions
    6.1 Logistics

    • DCA will guide the consultant in budgeting for field related costs, including food and accommodation.
    • DCA will guide the consultant in budgeting for daily payments of data collectors/enumerators in the field.
    • DCA will cater for in-country flight bookings and payment to field locations.

    6.2 Professional Fees

    • For the consultant to be taken into consideration for this consultancy, she or he must submit a narrative and financial proposal, including cost estimates for services rendered and daily consultancy fees.
    • Interested consultants are expected to provide a budget for the exercise.
    • DCA will consider proposals that are within the approved rates as per its policy on professional

    fees.6.3 Tax and insurance

    • Personal income tax payable to the Government of the Republic of South Sudan shall be deducted from the consultant’s fee during payment in accordance with the South Sudan tax laws.

    6.4 Code of Conduct

    • A contract will be signed by the consultant upon commencement of the baseline which will detail additional terms and conditions of service, aspects on inputs and deliverables including DCA’s Code of Conduct.

    6.5 Data collection and IT equipment

    • Tablets will be provided for the consultant to use for electronic data collection purposes. The consultant is expected to use their own computer throughout the consultancy for tools development, data analysis and reporting purposes.

    7.0. Consultancy Experience
    Below follows a brief description of the consultant(s) desired background and profile with emphasis on previous experience in similar work. The consultancy must offer expertise with the below essential and desirable profiles and qualifications. Female consultants or teams compromising with female team members will be encouraged to apply.

    Essential:

    • Holding a higher university degree in gender studies, statistics, monitoring and evaluation, project planning and management, social sciences, or any other relevant field with over 12 years of experience in gender and protection programming in fragile countries.
    • Knowledge on gender and protection programming, community vulnerability, NEXUS, rights-based and participatory approaches.
    • Strong understanding of the South Sudan context (specifically the context in Upper Nile State), policies and advocacy work.
    • Broad knowledge of humanitarian and development issues, specifically in gender, protection and livelihoods approaches.
    • Sound understanding of SPHERE standards, Core Humanitarian Standards and MEAL best practices and approaches.
    • Fully conversant with the principles and working methods of project cycle management, humanitarian evaluation methods and techniques, including a thorough understanding of data collection, evaluation methodologies and design, participatory approaches, and strong qualitative and quantitative research skills
    • Experience with evaluations in conflict-affected contexts
    • Experience of integrating gender dynamics within participatory data collection
    • Fluency in English, strong analysis, report writing and communication skills
    • Strong analytical skills, ability to clearly present findings, draw conclusions and make recommendations
    • Good interpersonal skills and understanding cultural sensitivities
    • Ability to work under pressure and to meet deadlines
    • Ability to deal with hardship and remote area field work

    Desirable:

    • Experience working in South Sudan or East Africa
    • Experience working for the European Union or experience of evaluating projects funded by the European Union.
    • Active member of gender or protection network
    • Knowledge of local languages is seen as an asset.
    • Knowledge of South Sudan’s COVID-19 situation and measures.

    NB:

    • Consultants and Service providers to DCA are subjected to comply with the organisation’s Code of
    • Conduct, Child Protection and PSEA policy.
    • Consultants are subjected to a counter-terrorism screening.
    • Bids that demonstrate how to carry out the assignment within the context of COVID-19 restrictions will be given favourable consideration.
    • DCA reserves the right to cancel this assignment without giving any notice.

    Annex 2
    Terms of Reference for End of Project Evaluation for DCA and partner implemented project, funded by the European Union titled: “The Future is Equal – Empowerment of women in Upper Nile State
    1.0 Background and Introduction
    1.1 Introduction of the Organisation
    DanChurchAid (DCA) is a decentralised Danish NGO, which primarily works with both local and international NGO partners, and it is a strong member of international networks/alliances including churches. DCA’s headquarter is in Copenhagen and has offices in 16 countries worldwide but supports projects/programmes in at least 25 countries. It seeks to assist the most marginalised populations through its four thematic programme types in South Sudan, namely, Active Citizenship, Right to Food, Humanitarian Response and Humanitarian Mine Action (HMA). Advocacy, right based approach (RBA), Nexus and Gender are its added value strategies in all interventions to address DCA global goals of Save Lives, Build Resilience and Fight Extreme inequality.
    DCA works with local communities and is increasingly involved in building the capacity of partners, communities, and local government institutions as well as its own staff. DCA’s South Sudan regional office is based in Juba and implements programmed through its partners in Jonglei, Upper Nile, Eastern Equatorial, Unity and Central Equatorial states.
    1.2 Background for Consultancy
    This term of reference describes DCA’s South Sudan objectives to undertake a Baseline survey for its project titled “The Future is Equal – Empowerment of women in Upper Nile State” funded by the European Union, and implemented through DCA’s local partner Across Africa Development Organisation (AADO). The ToR briefly describes the purposes of the baseline, proposed scope of work, methodologies, and deliverables from the survey team. Below are the details of the project Baseline considerations.

    1.3 Introduction of the Project
    The Future is Equal – Empowerment of women in Upper Nile State is funded by the European Union, and throughout this project DCA and its local partner AADO will implement an integrated approach to promote women’s economic, political and social empowerment at the local level in Ulang and Longechuk counties in Upper Nile State in the Northeast of South Sudan. The selected locations are among the most volatile areas of South Sudan, with specific challenges related to high rates of human rights violations and gender-based violence (GBV), including rape. Women and girls are the primary stakeholders of the action and will take on a leading role in the implementation and design of the action, taking charge of their lives and claiming equal rights, with continuous support through the proposed action. Men and boys will be engaged significantly, especially through the Engaging Men in Accountable Practices (EMAP) approach to facilitate attitude change towards women and girls. The engagement of influential stakeholders will further increase ownership of the change in attitudes and result in a significant reduction of use of harmful traditional practices. In addition, the action will aim to provide support to GBV service providers, including psychosocial support (PSS) providers, legal and paralegal service providers as well as medical facilities and actors providing clinical management of rape (CMR). Coupled with this are strengthened social support structures within the already existing social spaces in Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs), producer groups and GBV committees, which will reduce the culture of silence around gender injustice and provide support for those affected. The action envisages the final beneficiaries and engaged stakeholders of the action as future shapers of attitudes, practices and behaviours of people, advancing gender equality using the structures established through this action. By continuing to address expressions of toxic masculinity like GBV and violence against women and girls (VAW/G) within the targeted communities and beyond and offering response services within the referral pathway, final beneficiaries will contribute to nurturing a culture of intolerance to gender inequality.
    1.3.1. Project Goal
    The overall objectiveof the action focuses on empowering women and girls in South Sudan, specifically in Ulang and Longechuk Counties of Upper Nile State, who have been facing marginalisation and limitation as a result of a highly patriarchal and traditional society. This action will serve as a contribution to the promotion of women’s economic, political and social empowerment at the local level, with specific attention to those in the most vulnerable situations.
    1.3.2. Overall objective indicators

    • % of women with increased economic independency, control over household assets, decision-making power at household level and time savings
    • % of women and older adolescent girls who are enjoying equal decision-making power in political and civic structures at the local level
    • % of women, girls, men and boys with improved attitudes toward women’s and girls’ empowerment

    1.3.3. Project expected outcomes and outputs
    Outcome 1: Targeted communities demonstrate increased gender equality and awareness of harmful behaviour and social norms

    • Output 1.1: Men and boys trained on Engaging Men in Accountable Practice (EMAP) approaches and especially with focus on change of attitude and behaviour towards women and girls
    • Output 1.2: Community members made aware on general concept of GBV including women and girls’ rights within the community through awareness raising sessions

    Outcome 2: Economic capacity of targeted women and girls through entrepreneurship skills and vocational training is enhanced

    • Output 2.1. Women and older adolescent girls trained on entrepreneurship skills/ economic empowerment
    • Output 2.2. Women and older adolescent girls trained on practical vocational skills

    Outcome 3: Trained women and older girls’ take on leadership roles and actively participate in community decision-making processes

    • Output 3.1. Women and older girls trained on leadership skills and decision-making roles within the community

    Outcome 4: Access to quality and timely services for GBV survivors within the targeted communities is improved

    • Output 4.1. Case workers from the partners’ implementing response services trained on psychosocial support, case management and data protection to handle GBV survivors
    • Output 4.2. Community members (Chiefs, women’s leaders, police, paralegals) trained on national legal framework on GBV legal process and access to justice for GBV survivors
    • Output 4.3. Medical practitioners trained on Clinical Management of Rape (CMR)
    • Output 4.4. Community leaders (religious, traditional, youth and women leaders, Boma chiefs, Payam Administrators and NGO partners) trained on GBV Basic concepts for good coordination, referral pathways and networking

    2.0. Purpose of the Evaluation
    The end of project evaluation’s overall purpose is to demonstrate to which extend the 2-year project has achieved its intended objectives and determine what changes it has brought to the targeted communities. The data collected for this endline will be benchmarked against the baseline for an overview of the project performance on its different indicators in line with objectives.
    The specific objectives of this evaluation are to:

    • To establish the final status of project indicators with regard to gender equality and women’s empowerment, which to benchmark against the baseline figures
    • Assess the extent to which the project achieved its objectives with special emphasis on the outcomes and impact including most significant and indirect changes attributable to the project
    • To assess effectiveness and organisational efficiency in progressing towards the achievement of gender equality and women’s empowerment results as defined in the intervention
    • Assess prevailing social and economic contexts in the project area that implementation will need to consider
    • Establish livelihood activities mostly practiced by the communities through a gender lens
    • To provide an in-depth indicative information on the status of community safety and security of vulnerable populations in the project intervention areas
    • Access the appropriateness of the proposed action for all individuals and groups (women, men, youth)
    • To identify the existing protection and violence prevention issues and activities in the project intervention areas
    • Assess the relevance of the project design and strategy with special emphasis on community needs at the time of project identification, results as articulated in the project’s logical framework, cross-cutting issues of gender and a rights-based approach (RBA), Local Government Authorities (LGAs), community structures capacity building and its relevance to project implementation, the external environment (context) within which the project was operational and its influence on project successes and/or failures
    • Determine main needs of the beneficiaries within the proposed project description that the programming should address
    • Assess appropriateness of indicators
    • To provide benchmark information for measuring project achievements and outcomes based on the project log frame
    • Assess project efficiency in utilisation of mobilised and committed resources during the implementation and procurement of project inputs
    • Determine the synergies of this project with other partner implemented projects in the same geographic area and coordination with other actors and make recommendation aimed at achieving greater impact.
    • Assess how to minimise the unintended negative effects which can increase people's vulnerability to both physical and psychosocial risks.
    • To identify major external factors that may influence or impact the implementation of the project
    • Assess any potential risks to the project and how cross cutting themes will be integrated into the project.
    • Establish the level of networking and/or coordination achieved by the project with its stakeholders
    • Establish the level of project results sustainability with various stakeholders (beneficiary, community, LGAs and other actors) with focus on innovation and best practice
    • Assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the project monitoring and evaluation, focusing on DCA and its partners monitoring tools and how these could be strengthened in future projects.
    • Assess the functionality of the complaints handling mechanisms that were put in place and how effective the mechanisms were during the project.
    • Establish and determine the level of synergies, networking and coordination with its direct stakeholders and other actors and make recommendation aimed at achieving greater synergies and networking in future programming.
    • Assess the effectiveness of the processes of beneficiary engagement and project implementation against best practices in the project.

    DCA will share the detailed Logical Framework with the successful consultant for full consolidation with the objectives of the evaluation.

    3.0. Evaluation Scope and Methodology
    This evaluation is expected to cover the project implementation period from 1. February 2021 to 31. January 2023, as implemented in Ulang and Longechuck Counties of Upper Nile State. The evaluation will be conducted in January/February 2023. Any adjustments of the timeframe will be allowed only after agreement with DCA and donor. DCA recommends a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Proposed approaches could include or extend beyond cross sectional household surveys, key informant interviews/virtual key informant interviews, focus group discussions, documents reviews and analysis, case studies, observation, or any other appropriate techniques. The consultant is required to use a mix of techniques which best collects required data from both direct and indirect project beneficiaries and where applicable, the evaluator will adopt a participatory approach to data collection when engaging with different respondents. Furthermore, where appropriate, use joint sessions that can make use of stakeholder engagement and analysis tools to evaluate project relevancy, efficiency, effectiveness, impact, and sustainability. It is important to reiterate that the proposed evaluation techniques should explicitly demonstrate how cross cutting themes, such as protection, gender and disability, shall be integrated across the modalities including the do no harm principles.

    3.1 Evaluation Methodology
    A combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches will be used. Proposed approaches will include cross-sectional household surveys, key informant interviews, focus group discussions, documents review and analysis, as well as case studies, observations, or any other appropriate techniques and mix of techniques which best collects data from direct and indirect project beneficiaries. Where applicable, the consultant will adopt a participatory approach to respondents and project stakeholders, who may include representatives from national, state or local government, partners and communities. In addition, the methodology should spell out how stakeholders will participate at each level during the evaluation. The clusters are part of the stakeholders; hence the consultant should plan to meet the Food security ad Livelihoods, Protection and Health Clusters, and any other relevant stakeholders for relevant information/data sharing.

    • Techniques: Consultant should use a combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques to undertake this evaluation. Survey techniques could combine or run as separate parallel surveys. Creativity in use of techniques is at discretion of the consultant. However, all techniques must be globally acceptable randomised techniques.
    • Data Quality: The design techniques of data collection should ensure and enforce data quality with quick steps back to revalidate data collected. All data shall meet standards such as accuracy, reliability, and validity of data. As part of data collection preparation, the consultant shall conduct thorough training of enumerators including pre-testing. The consultant will be expected to design tools and collect data using the electronic data collection tool KoBoToolbox and KoBoCollect for the survey.
    • Data Interpretation and Presentation: The consultant shall present data disaggregated by status, geographical levels, partners and gender, conducted with statically software for analysis and graphical presentations of project key indicators to establish trends over time to provide a comparative analysis by including the data from baseline and project monitoring.

    3.2. Key End of Project Evaluation Questions
    The report is expected to provide answers to the following, not exhaustive list of questions:
    Relevance and quality of the Design:

    • To which extent were the needs of different right- and stakeholders (women, men, girls, boys) met by the

    intervention?

    • To what extend did the project align to the goals of DCA’s South Sudan country strategy?
    • To what extend have recommendations and lesson learnt from previous evaluations been incorporated in the design?
    • Was a thorough risk assessment carried out to identify risks to the project, including possible mitigation measures? How was this used to shape the project and what can be learnt from this?
    • How were modalities selected to implement the separate activities? Did a response analysis take place? Was modality appropriateness reviewed during the project?
    • Were the selected modalities the most appropriate to meet the needs of beneficiaries and appropriate to the geographical areas?

    Appropriateness:

    • Estimate the satisfaction among the targeted population, both female and male, on the modalities of trainings and other inputs received through this action
    • Are there appropriate, functioning systems of accountability (participation, information sharing,

    feedback and complaints) that beneficiaries are using?

    • Are beneficiary feedback and complaints received used to shape the response? How?
    • Was there an appropriate system of information management and communication in place?
    • Was new learning being captured and acted upon during implementation? If yes, how and what? If no,

    why not?Efficiency of Implementation:

    • Were all inputs delivered and was there enough time allowed for the achievement of the intended objectives and outputs?
    • What was the local leaders and chiefs’ assessment of this intervention?
    • Have most of the project outcomes been achieved to an acceptable standard and in time?
    • Was the budget been spent according to the proposed budget lines?
    • Was the rate of spending acceptable?
    • Did DCA and its partner have sufficient skills to manage the project effectively?
    • Were the activities implemented in the most efficient way?

    Effectiveness of the Project:

    • Evaluate how the overall project plan and its subsequent annual plans were implemented. What worked, what did not work?
    • What project component(s) were more effective and why?
    • Has coordination with other humanitarian actors been effective?
    • Have the effects of the project been felt equally across the whole project area or are some areas
    • neglected?
    • Have the effects of the project been felt equally across the project stakeholders or other stakeholders
    • neglected?
    • Was there any influence or abuse by agency staff, local elites or authorities reported?
    • To what extend was coordination with authorities, other NGOs as well as clusters and relevant working groups (local or national level) done to ensure this project is complementary to their efforts, duplication is minimised, learning is shared, and technical recommendations are known and understood?
    • How did DCA and partners ensure that beneficiary data was handled responsibly and safely throughout the project cycle? What practices emerged; what gaps are being identified?

    Impact of the Project:

    • To what extend have the project contributed to the promotion of women’s economic, political and social empowerment at the local level, with specific attention to those in the most vulnerable situations?
    • To what extent have beneficiaries, including duty bearers/local government institutions/local leaders

    benefited from project outputs and outcomes?

    • To what extent does the targeted communities demonstrate increased gender equality and awareness of harmful behaviour and social norms?
    • To what extend is the economic capacity of targeted women and girls through entrepreneurship skills and vocational training enhanced?
    • To what extend does trained women and older girls take on leadership roles and actively participate in community decision-making processes after the project has ended?
    • To what extend has the access to quality and timely services for GBV survivors within the targeted communities improved?

    Potential of Project Sustainability
    The sustainability of the project will bedetermined by the appropriateness of the exit strategy, project orientation for continuity and planning through the following questions:

    • To what extent can the outputs be expected to be sustainable?
    • Assess the continuity of established community structures such as updated referral points beyond the project lifespan?
    • Do the community have the capacity to sustain the results of the intervention?
    • Do the local government authorities/ community leaders/chiefs fully support the initiatives taken by the project?
    • To what extent are the target communities contributing to the sustainability of the initiatives?
    • Did the project design include a practical exit strategy?
    • Were the all the stakeholders involved in designing the exit strategy?
    • Did the project establish any referral mechanisms for needs beyond the assistance provided or specialised services required for groups with special needs? If so, how were referrals made and what learning emerged from this. Where they unmet needs?

    Inclusion of the cross-cutting issues: i.e. (gender, age and diversity, Protection, HIV, social inclusion and accountability to beneficiaries).

    • Did the project address the different needs of the beneficiaries in a consistent manner, considering the different needs of women, men, girls and boys, different social and ethnic groups as well as disability issues and child protection?
    • What measures did the project take to contribute towards reduction of inequalities? Where are ways to improve reduction of inequality and gender mainstreaming in the project cycle?
    • How transparent has the project been to communities, counterparts and the donor, e.g. information sharing, operating effective feedback mechanisms, participation, monitoring, evaluation, and learning?
    • Participation in decision making and empowerment opportunities to support development of self-protection, capacities and assist people to claim their rights to i.e. food, shelter, health, and education services.

    DCA will share the detailed Logical Framework with the successful consultant for further question development where needed for alignment.

    4.0. Deliverables and Schedule
    4.1. Inception Report
    An inception report is to be prepared and submitted by the consultant after an initial desk review of relevant documents. The report is to include:

    • Conceptual framework to be used in the evaluation, stating key questions and methodology, including information on data courses and collection, sampling and key indicators
    • Stakeholder mapping indicating various stakeholders to be interviewed and on what aspects.
    • Detailed evaluation design, methodology, and sample size criteria and calculations.
    • Detailed work plan including timelines, activities, and risks and mitigation measures.
    • Bibliography of documents/secondary data sources utilised.
    • Final data collection tools, such as household survey, key informant interview guide, focus group discussion guide, and analysis plan.
    • Indicate who, if consultancy team, will undertake exercises and their roles, including their experiences and core competency/expertise.

    4.1.1. Presentation of first draft:
    The consultant will be required to organise a one-day presentation of the first draft evaluation report, hold a debriefing meeting with DCA and partners to discuss the draft evaluation report. The draft report must include:

    • Sampling Framework and tools
    • Raw data collected
    • Report stating methodologies, survey documents, findings, recommendations, and necessary support

    The debriefing meeting with DCA and partner is meant for discussion and feedback on the evaluation report, and the final evaluation report shall comply with the format and provide answers to the evaluation questions.4.2. Evaluation report
    The report will make use of the project’s baseline report, clearly having a comparative analysis of key indicators and well as disaggregated results. The report will comply with the format and answering the evaluation questions in a 1-3-25 format making use of the suggested report structure.

    4.3. Most significant change stories
    The evaluation shall include most significant change stories, a minimum of 2 per location.

    4.4. Proposed activities scheduling
    Below is the proposed itinerary during the evaluation. The baseline is expected to commence in January 2023:

    Activity/ Milestone
    Duration
    Consultant preparation
    3 days

    Meetings with project team in Juba, presentation of inception report
    2 days

    Field work in Ulang and Longechuck Counties
    6 days

    Debriefing
    3 day

    Data cleaning and analysis
    4 days

    Preparation of draft report for dissemination to DCA and partner
    3 days

    Total days
    21 days
    5.0. Evaluation Management
    The consultant will develop the evaluation methodology. Thereafter, a participatory review approach will be adopted to ensure key partner project staffs have a chance to meaningfully participate in refining the methodology and tools considering the foregoing:

    • The entire exercise is structured to adopt joint planning sessions with project staff, programme briefings by management staff in line with the logframe, baseline, project documents, and the country strategy. Others include focus group discussions, key informant interviews with stakeholders, protection cluster representatives, implementing partner staff and government representatives in each targeted county.
    • DCA’s Programme Officer (M&E) will be the focal point for this work.
    • Using different methods, the evaluation is expected to collect relevant data and to triangulate it throughout from different sources and methodologies, thus ensuring greater validity of information. Groups that will provide the required data include NNGOs, INGOs, DCA and partner programme staff, community groups, government representatives and special interest groups within the community (such as protection committees, medical staff and community leaders). Secondary data from previous reviews, progress reports, proposals, and other related documents will be considered.
    • The consultant shall use the electronic data collection platform KoBoToolbox and KoBoCollect throughout the data collection.
    • A debriefing session will be held with the programme staff at the end of the field visit – both in the field and in Juba. The debriefing sessions will provide a summary of the outcome of the evaluation.
    • A team comprising of DCA’s Head of Programme, Programme Coordinator and Programme Officers, as well as relevant AADO staffs will support the consultant on matters particularly related to the evaluation.
    • DCA will provide overall operational/logistical coordination for the evaluation study.
    • Accommodation and transport for the consultant during the field work will be catered for by DCA.
    • Survey logistics such as translators, car/boat hire, facilitators, office space or training venues, internet will be provided by DCA or its partners.
    • DCA will process security clearances for consultants with the respective authorities.
    • Domestic travel will be arranged through DCA. However, the consultant is responsible for planning their international flights/visa, if coming from outside of South Sudan.
    • DCA will reimburse or meet costs associated with visa and registration.

    6.0. Terms and Conditions6.1 Logistics

    • DCA will guide the consultant in budgeting for field related costs, including food and accommodation.
    • DCA will guide the consultant in budgeting for daily payments of data collectors/enumerators in the field.
    • DCA will cater for in-country flight bookings and payment to field locations.

    6.2 Professional Fees

    • For the consultant to be taken into consideration for this consultancy, she or he must submit a narrative and financial proposal, including cost estimates for services rendered and daily consultancy fees.
    • Interested consultants are expected to provide a budget for the exercise.
    • DCA will consider proposals that are within the approved rates as per its policy on professional fees.

    6.3 Tax and insurance

    • Personal income tax payable to the Government of the Republic of South Sudan shall be deducted from the consultant’s fee during payment in accordance with the South Sudan tax laws.

    6.4 Code of Conduct

    • A contract will be signed by the consultant upon commencement of the evaluation which will detail additional terms and conditions of service, aspects on inputs and deliverables including DCA’s Code of Conduct.

    6.5 Data collection and IT equipment

    • Tablets will be provided for the consultant to use for electronic data collection purposes. The consultant is expected to use his/her own computer throughout the consultancy for tools development, data analysis and reporting purposes.

    7.0. Consultancy Experience

    • Holding a higher university degree in gender studies, statistics, monitoring and evaluation, project planning and management, social sciences, or any other relevant field with over 12 years of experience in gender and protection programming in fragile countries.
    • Knowledge on gender and protection programming, community vulnerability, NEXUS, rights-based and participatory approaches.
    • Strong understanding of the South Sudan context (specifically the context in Upper Nile State), policies and advocacy work.
    • Broad knowledge of humanitarian and development issues, specifically in gender, protection and livelihoods approaches.
    • Sound understanding of SPHERE standards, Core Humanitarian Standards and MEAL best practices and approaches.
    • Fully conversant with the principles and working methods of project cycle management, humanitarian evaluation methods and techniques, including a thorough understanding of data collection, evaluation methodologies and design, participatory approaches, and strong qualitative and quantitative research skills
    • Experience with evaluations in conflict-affected contexts
    • Experience of integrating gender dynamics within participatory data collection
    • Fluency in English, strong analysis, report writing and communication skills
    • Strong analytical skills, ability to clearly present findings, draw conclusions and make recommendations
    • Good interpersonal skills and understanding cultural sensitivities
    • Ability to work under pressure and to meet deadlines
    • Ability to deal with hardship and remote area field work

    Desirable:

    • Experience working in South Sudan or East Africa
    • Experience working for the European Union or experience of evaluating projects funded by the European Union.
    • Active member of gender and or protection network.
    • Knowledge of local languages is seen as an asset.

    NB:

    • Consultants and Service providers to DCA are subjected to comply with the organisation’s Code of
    • Conduct, Child Protection and PSEA policy.
    • Consultants are subjected to a counter-terrorism screening.
    • DCA reserves the right to cancel this assignment without giving any notice.

    Please note that it is currently required for foreigners to be quarantined for 14 days upon arrival to South Sudan as a measure against the spread of COVID-19, and any costs related to this will be met by the consultant.

    Information:
    Place: Juba , South Sudan
    Deadline: 12/03 2021
    Contact person: Mugove Chakurira
    Head of Programmes
    DanChurchAid South Sudan

    Apply now

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